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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
states, california, nevada and florida, have already made self-driving vehicles legal as long as the human's sitting in the driver's seat in case of a emergency. that's a good idea. meanwhile, these cars could lose worker productivity. the average commuter spends 250 hours a year behind the wheel. or they could come in handy after you've had a couple cocktails. self-driving trucks could transform the trucking industry. picture long lines of self-driving 18-wheelers traveling down the highway just a few inches apart, no drivers, no stops for gas or food, it could boost fuel efficiency as much as 20%. we're going to need to keep driving ourselves though for a while longer. experts say the driverless cars should be more common in another ten to 15 years when the costs come down. here's the question, how would you feel about riding in a car that drives itself? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile, post a comment on my blog. or go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i don't know if i'd trust a car to drive itself. >> me either. i wouldn't feel good about it at all, jack. n
, is anything we do online really private? ed in california, nope. since the inception of homeland security, we have no privacy. e-mails and all social media's recorded and scrutinized by homeland security. if you want privacy, talk in person, not electronically. these generals should have known better, especially petraeus. pete in georgia writes, the internet is a wide open global cesspool with zero security or privacy. the average person can't control their urges or impulses to fully accept the fact that the internet is the largest spider web ever devised. george bush and dick cheney eliminated our rights to privacy and any need to warrants. brad, the camel's act nose under the tent. see which party provided the most votes to pass it. anyone who thinks what he or she posts online will remain private just doesn't see the world as it is. and martha writes this, probably not. but looks like delving into someone else's e-mail can have unforeseen consequences. basically a cat spat between two silly broads fighting over one guy that morphed into a scenario involving the fbi, cia, the justice depart
is standing outside a walmart in paramount, california. you were in the middle of the protests today. tell us what happened. >> reporter: this is a very large protest here, joe. there were at the height of this the l.a. county sheriff's department estimating about 1,000 protesters in or around this particular walmart. and this protest, it was loud, it was ruckus, it was the very opposite of what you might expect on a black friday shopping day here at a walmart. and that's the point. the employees who walked off the job joined by many supporters and labor say they want today make the point to management that they want to have a fair discussion about pay, about health care as well about the hours that they work. they chose black friday, a very potent day to make that point. here's what an employee as well as a shopper told us what they think. >> they say do this, do that. none of it works. this is the only way we can get our voice out there is speaking with the media, the public. >> just a matter that they have to, you know, do things right for the employees. >> doing things right for the emplo
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)